Published In

Ecology

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-1989

Subjects

Insect-plant relationships, Ants -- Ecology, Seeds -- Dispersal

Abstract

Two co—occurring deciduous forest myrmecochores, Asarum canadense and Jeffersonia diphylla, release their seeds at approximately the same time, and therefore potentially compete for ants as dispersers. Within a single woodlot, we placed seeds of both species inside a dense Jeffersonia population away from Asarum plants, inside a dense Asarum population away from Jeffersonia plants, and in a site where plants of neither species occurred. No preference was exhibited by ants where natural populations were absent. Preference at the other two sites was frequency dependent: ants preferred seeds of the introduced species. Species preferred by ants have higher seed and seedling survival because by being carried into ant nests they escape predation and avoid nutrient deficiency. Implications of frequency—dependent dispersal are discussed.

Description

This is the publisher's final PDF. Copyright by the Ecological Society of America this article was originally published in Ecology and can be found online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/1938098

DOI

10.2307/1938098

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/12357

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