Start Date

8-5-2013 2:15 PM

End Date

8-5-2013 3:45 PM

Subjects

Libya -- Politics and government -- 21st century, Libya -- Social conditions, Social change -- Libya, Mass media and culture -- Libya, Islam and state, Tamazight language -- Content analysis

Description

This paper examines segments from the very first Tamazight language TV news broadcast in the history of Libya in May 11, 2011. In the analysis, I focus on (a) Tamazight-Arabic code switching and (b) the profound influence of Arabic on the Tamazight spoken in this situation. Before the February 17 Revolution, such a broadcast was unthinkable, as the use of the language in such public contexts was outlawed during Gaddafi's rule. Post Feb. 17, the Tamazight language emerged in the media as a new linguistic spoken and written resource in the Libyan setting itself up as in contrast to and in competition with Arabic- the official language of Libya. Partly as a result of language policies of Gaddafi's government, most Libyan Amazigh are bilingual; however, Arabic is understandably their dominant language. Let's examine the following examples: (SA: standard Arabic LA: Libyan Arabic B: Borrowed words T: Tamazight) (1) fursa. taiba. wa b.ism illahi a.raHman a.raHeem. chance. great. and. in. name Allah (God) the. gracious the. merciful / LA LA SA SA SA SA (2) In. shaa Allah alibieen ukul adifrah.een-sees / If. willing. Allah libyans. all happy. will be (plur). with it SA SA LA LA B T (If Allah wishes, all Libyans will be happy with it) Being bilingual, most Libyan- Amazigh are more fluent in Arabic than Tamazight due to the linguistic policies of Gaddafi's regime – an issue that will proof critical in the linguistic choices of Amazigh intellectuals as they interact on TV.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/9494

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May 8th, 2:15 PM May 8th, 3:45 PM

Post-Revolution Language Change in the Libyan Media: Tamahaq News Broadcast

This paper examines segments from the very first Tamazight language TV news broadcast in the history of Libya in May 11, 2011. In the analysis, I focus on (a) Tamazight-Arabic code switching and (b) the profound influence of Arabic on the Tamazight spoken in this situation. Before the February 17 Revolution, such a broadcast was unthinkable, as the use of the language in such public contexts was outlawed during Gaddafi's rule. Post Feb. 17, the Tamazight language emerged in the media as a new linguistic spoken and written resource in the Libyan setting itself up as in contrast to and in competition with Arabic- the official language of Libya. Partly as a result of language policies of Gaddafi's government, most Libyan Amazigh are bilingual; however, Arabic is understandably their dominant language. Let's examine the following examples: (SA: standard Arabic LA: Libyan Arabic B: Borrowed words T: Tamazight) (1) fursa. taiba. wa b.ism illahi a.raHman a.raHeem. chance. great. and. in. name Allah (God) the. gracious the. merciful / LA LA SA SA SA SA (2) In. shaa Allah alibieen ukul adifrah.een-sees / If. willing. Allah libyans. all happy. will be (plur). with it SA SA LA LA B T (If Allah wishes, all Libyans will be happy with it) Being bilingual, most Libyan- Amazigh are more fluent in Arabic than Tamazight due to the linguistic policies of Gaddafi's regime – an issue that will proof critical in the linguistic choices of Amazigh intellectuals as they interact on TV.