Location

Portland State University

Start Date

4-5-2016 1:30 PM

End Date

4-5-2016 3:00 PM

Subjects

Consciousness -- Physiological aspects, Visual perception

Description

In this paper I argue against Kevin O’Regan’s claim that the “biological reflectance function” and its notion of “simple” colors naturally lead to a biologically consistent standard for species wide color naming. Although the simplicity of these colors may allow for easier apprehension, the notion that color simplicity will naturally lead to a consistent standard for the naming of basic color hues across a species is inconsistent with the idea of objective colors in the way that he portrays it. While it fixes many of the traditional explanatory issues surrounding color perception, it opens up new explanatory issues surrounding color. In response to this I argue that more emphasis must be put on the place of socio/cultural judgements and habits in the sensorimotor approach to color perception. In contrast to O’Regans assertion that culture follows natural tendencies to name certain colors, I argue that color naming follows socio-cultural considerations for color naming regardless of objectivity of color experience.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17151

Included in

Philosophy Commons

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May 4th, 1:30 PM May 4th, 3:00 PM

The Sensorimotor Approach to Color Perception and the Necessity of Socio-cultural Considerations for Color Naming

Portland State University

In this paper I argue against Kevin O’Regan’s claim that the “biological reflectance function” and its notion of “simple” colors naturally lead to a biologically consistent standard for species wide color naming. Although the simplicity of these colors may allow for easier apprehension, the notion that color simplicity will naturally lead to a consistent standard for the naming of basic color hues across a species is inconsistent with the idea of objective colors in the way that he portrays it. While it fixes many of the traditional explanatory issues surrounding color perception, it opens up new explanatory issues surrounding color. In response to this I argue that more emphasis must be put on the place of socio/cultural judgements and habits in the sensorimotor approach to color perception. In contrast to O’Regans assertion that culture follows natural tendencies to name certain colors, I argue that color naming follows socio-cultural considerations for color naming regardless of objectivity of color experience.