Title

Habitat, Geophysical, and Eco-Social Connectivity: Benefits of Resilient Socio-Ecological Landscapes

Published In

Landscape Ecology

Document Type

Citation

Publication Date

9-27-2021

Abstract

Context

Connections among ecosystems and their components are critical to maintaining ecological functions and benefits in human-modified landscapes, including urban areas. However, the literature on connectivity and ecosystem services has been limited by inconsistent terminology and methods, and largely omits human access to nature and its benefits as a form of connectivity.

Objectives

In this paper, we build upon previous research and theory to define distinct categories of connectivity, considering both ecological and social dimensions, and identify ecosystem services that are supported by them.

Methods

We reviewed the literature to determine socio–ecological benefits that depend on the categories of connectivity.

Results

We identified four distinct but interrelated categories of connectivity: landscape, habitat, geophysical, and eco-social connectivity. Each connectivity category directly or indirectly supports many ecosystem services. There are overlaps, conflicts, and synergies among connectivity categories and their associated services and disservices.

Conclusions

Identifying the services that arise from these four categories of connectivity, and how they interact, can help build a common understanding of the value of connectivity to maximize its benefits, improve understanding of complex socio–ecological systems across disciplines, and develop more holistic, socially equitable decision-making processes, especially in urban landscapes.

Rights

© 2021 Springer

DOI

10.1007/s10980-021-01339-y

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/36676

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