Location

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Start Date

25-7-2014 1:15 PM

End Date

25-7-2014 2:15 PM

Subjects

Information literacy -- Study and teaching -- Congresses

Description

Instructional librarians are challenged to address issues of scalability and sustainability in ways that foster instructional creativity. As a result of a South Dakota Board of Regents mandate, IL instruction is required in four general- education courses at the University of South Dakota (USD). The resulting heavy volume of instruction poses problems of scalability and quality for the library faculty. This presentation by the University Libraries' instructional design team (IDT) demonstrates how inverted or flipped instruction can be used to provide scalable sustainable and effective information literacy (IL) instruction. We include a discussion of the affordances and constraints of inverted instruction identified through this project. As a result of this presentation, participants will understand the applicability of inverted instruction to IL programs, appreciate the benefits of inverted instruction for both students and librarians, and identify ways to apply inverted or flipped pedagogy to their own IL instruction.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/14463

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Jul 25th, 1:15 PM Jul 25th, 2:15 PM

Give a Flip: Making Library Instruction Scalable and Sustainable Through Inversion

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Instructional librarians are challenged to address issues of scalability and sustainability in ways that foster instructional creativity. As a result of a South Dakota Board of Regents mandate, IL instruction is required in four general- education courses at the University of South Dakota (USD). The resulting heavy volume of instruction poses problems of scalability and quality for the library faculty. This presentation by the University Libraries' instructional design team (IDT) demonstrates how inverted or flipped instruction can be used to provide scalable sustainable and effective information literacy (IL) instruction. We include a discussion of the affordances and constraints of inverted instruction identified through this project. As a result of this presentation, participants will understand the applicability of inverted instruction to IL programs, appreciate the benefits of inverted instruction for both students and librarians, and identify ways to apply inverted or flipped pedagogy to their own IL instruction.