Title

Assessment Works!: Sustaining and Renewing Information Literacy Efforts

Presenter Information

Larissa Gordon, Arcadia University

Location

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Start Date

24-7-2014 3:15 PM

End Date

24-7-2014 3:35 PM

Subjects

Information literacy -- Study and teaching

Description

To be truly sustainable, any information literacy program should include a formal plan for the assessment of student learning goals. This presentation will briefly discuss the implementation of the information literacy survey program, which is now in its third year, and review lessons learned from the survey's implementation and from changes made to the survey instrument. Finally, a few of the most interesting preliminary results will be discussed. One such result is our finding that by their senior year students do not seem to have a very sophisticated understanding of some of the larger concepts behind research, and that more specifically their ability to articulate and discuss their "research process" or "search strategy" is limited. Solutions to this issue were developed in partnership with faculty, and the library is now working to include reflective activities into library workshop sessions, and to use more deliberate language when talking with students about their research processes.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/14542

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Jul 24th, 3:15 PM Jul 24th, 3:35 PM

Assessment Works!: Sustaining and Renewing Information Literacy Efforts

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

To be truly sustainable, any information literacy program should include a formal plan for the assessment of student learning goals. This presentation will briefly discuss the implementation of the information literacy survey program, which is now in its third year, and review lessons learned from the survey's implementation and from changes made to the survey instrument. Finally, a few of the most interesting preliminary results will be discussed. One such result is our finding that by their senior year students do not seem to have a very sophisticated understanding of some of the larger concepts behind research, and that more specifically their ability to articulate and discuss their "research process" or "search strategy" is limited. Solutions to this issue were developed in partnership with faculty, and the library is now working to include reflective activities into library workshop sessions, and to use more deliberate language when talking with students about their research processes.