Location

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

Start Date

24-7-2014 3:15 PM

End Date

24-7-2014 3:45 PM

Subjects

Information literacy -- Study and teaching -- Congresses, Library instruction

Description

In the summer of 2013, the Claremont Colleges Library undertook a rubric-based assessment of Pitzer College First-Year Seminar papers to determine if librarian course interventions had an impact on information literacy (IL) performance in student writing. Findings indicate that progressive degrees of librarian collaboration in two distinct areas (research instruction and/or faculty syllabus consultation) had a marked and statistically significant impact on student IL skills. This presentation will discuss our findings and suggest strategies at the individual and program level that contribute to effective course collaboration frameworks in the first year and beyond. These include outcomes-focused teaching, ongoing professional development for faculty and librarians, and intentional communities of practice, all of which provide a bridge across diverse syllabi and subjects while preserving the individuality of librarian pedagogy.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/14474

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Jul 24th, 3:15 PM Jul 24th, 3:45 PM

More = Better: A Rubric-Based Evaluation of Librarian Course Collaborations at the First Year

Portland State University, Portland, Oregon

In the summer of 2013, the Claremont Colleges Library undertook a rubric-based assessment of Pitzer College First-Year Seminar papers to determine if librarian course interventions had an impact on information literacy (IL) performance in student writing. Findings indicate that progressive degrees of librarian collaboration in two distinct areas (research instruction and/or faculty syllabus consultation) had a marked and statistically significant impact on student IL skills. This presentation will discuss our findings and suggest strategies at the individual and program level that contribute to effective course collaboration frameworks in the first year and beyond. These include outcomes-focused teaching, ongoing professional development for faculty and librarians, and intentional communities of practice, all of which provide a bridge across diverse syllabi and subjects while preserving the individuality of librarian pedagogy.