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Call For Manuscripts.

As educators, we all have readings that are cornerstone texts for us, that we return to for inspiration in tough times or we revisit when we need reminders about our work. Recently I revisited Thomas Newkirk’s 2009 text, Holding on to Good Ideas in a Time of Bad Ones: Six Literacy Principles Worth Fighting For. I was not looking back to refresh my memory of literacy strategies as much as I was looking back for my “grounding”. I have been very fortunate to have strong mentors in my teaching career, people who have pushed me to build a belief system and make decisions about teaching that keep me grounded within those beliefs. Beliefs such as all kids can learn and kids need choice in what they read and write—those sorts of ideas. In the field of literacy, this has been important as policies come and go. But lately in my work as a teacher educator, I have felt ungrounded, which is what took me back to Newkirk to help me think about how the decisions in my work are made and how they are (or aren’t) connected with my foundational beliefs.

In the next issue of NWJTE, we welcome submissions on a variety of topics related to teaching and teacher education. The editors would like to encourage thought on practice that is continuously checked against a belief-system. We encourage authors to consider: How do we tie our decisions back to our vision of providing every child with equitable access to an emancipatory education? How do we make decisions that hold pre-K - 12 learners in the forefront of our thinking? How do we make sure we are not blowing with the winds of the next educational trend but instead hold onto those values that support all learners? In addition, we invite authors to consider: What are the current issues in your community? How are teachers working to engage with those issues? How can professionals who prepare teachers support engagement with the issues in the communities where we live and work? What are the implications for the children in the schools where the teachers we prepare teach? And, how do our beliefs support our continued work with teachers and the communities we serve?

Submission deadline: February 15, 2019 for spring publication.