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Call For Manuscripts.

Becoming a teacher entails more than merely earning a certificate or getting a job. Instead, it involves being drawn into a community of practice, moving from what Lave and Wenger refer to as "legitimate peripheral participation" to the centermost parts of the teaching endeavor. In this sense, teacher education resembles old-world apprenticeship models, in which the newcomer is guided into the profession by an "old-timer," a seasoned expert who has mastered all the elements of his or her craft.

Given the importance of mentoring in inducting new members into the teaching fold, this issue of The Northwest Journal of Teacher Education is devoted to exploring the roles of mentors at all levels of education. Submissions are invited to consider the following questions: To what extent is mentoring a culturally-specific activity? How might cross-cultural mentoring be made effective? Who mentors the mentors? How does mentoring change as the mentees gain experience? What does mentoring look like in a K-12 classroom? How does it differ from teaching? How should we evaluate mentoring? How might mentors and administrators best work together to support newcomers? How have popular representations of mentors/mentoring influenced teachers' conceptions of the mentoring process? How might potential mentors be effectively identified and recruited? In addition to these questions, the NWJTE is interested in stories of mentoring, particularly from voices often under-represented in academic literature: student-teachers, mentor teachers, and university field supervisors. Furthermore, we welcome the voices of mentors from underrepresented settings, such as tribal schools and small rural district. Finally, we are seeking submissions from those who bring perspective on the topic of mentoring as a social justice activity.

Submission deadline: August 15, 2018 for fall 2018 publication.