Advisor

Lauren Frank

Date of Award

8-29-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Communication

Department

Communication

Physical Description

1 online resource (iv, 88 pages)

Subjects

Video gamers -- Attitudes, Video games -- Authorship -- Sex differences, Video games -- Design

DOI

10.15760/etd.3150

Abstract

This study evaluates perception differences of male and female narrators in video game tutorials. Video games have long been considered a masculine pursuit, and because of this, women have endured unpleasant surroundings and interactions in gaming and related communities. With the proliferation of technologies like Twitch and YouTube gaming, gaming is more communicative than ever, increasing potential for problematic interactions. Recent booms in these technologies emphasize the importance of understanding how varying demographics are perceived, as these perceptions influence interactions, potentially limiting the likelihood of women and others' involvement and interest.

Involvement in technology during youth is associated with interests in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics careers--all fields with disparities in women's employment. Measures included confidence, credibility, performance, trustworthiness, and leadership ability to better understand how the integration of communicative technologies into gaming influences perceptions based on cues--in this case, specifically voice. Male narrators were hypothesized to be evaluated as more confident and credible than female narrators overall, while performance, trustworthiness, and leadership evaluations were hypothesized to be moderated by one's own gender identity. No significant differences emerged, which suggests a positive change in climate for female gamers and leaders in the industry.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/18306

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