Date of Award

5-1-1970

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Physical Description

1 online resource (48 leaves)

Subjects

Industrial accidents

DOI

10.15760/etd.607

Abstract

This study investigates the efficacy of Kerr’s (1957) “Goals-Freedom-Alertness” (GFA) theory of accident causation and Likert’s (1961) theory of dissimilar attitudes between supervisory levels as applied to the U.S. Forest Service. There are two types of ranger districts, those rated high and low on the basis of accident frequency ratios. From each district four subjects from each of two supervisory levels were administered a battery of ten scales. The overall results indicate that neither GFA theory was supported on the district variable, nor Likert’s theory on the supervisor variable. The results independent of theory do indicate that the manner in which the district ranger is seen by his immediate subordinates is related to accident frequency.

Description

Portland State University. Dept. of Psychology

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/9169

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