Presentation Type

Poster

Subjects

Discrimination, Racism, Stereotypes (Social psychology), Organizational behavior, Discrimination in employment

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Martinez, Larry Dr.

Student Level

Post Baccalaureate

Abstract

Stigmatized individuals use several compensatory strategies to offset the negative impact of interpersonal discrimination in the job application process, including increased positivity, providing individuating information, or identity disclosures. Using interviews and surveys, we aim to expand this literature by examining how these processes unfold after stigmatized individuals have gained employment and are interacting with coworkers. These compensatory strategies can have varying impacts on targets’ workplace relationships, job satisfaction, overall performance, and psychological and physical health outcomes. Leaders and other powerful organizational members can mitigate these negative outcomes and improve employee well being through leader member exchange and perceived supervisor support. With this research, practitioners and organizational leaders can develop a clearer understanding of the experiences of stigmatized individuals and can make more informed decisions, have more intentional policies, and provide better support to make their organizations more inclusive and socially responsible, reduce potential litigation costs and influence legislation. Stigmatized individuals can modify their usage of these strategies to have better outcomes in the workplace and on their psychological and physical health. Allies can be better advocates by understanding the experiences of stigmatized groups. Feedback form

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35412

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Exploring The Correlational Relationship Of Interpersonal Discrimination And Leader-Member Exchange

Stigmatized individuals use several compensatory strategies to offset the negative impact of interpersonal discrimination in the job application process, including increased positivity, providing individuating information, or identity disclosures. Using interviews and surveys, we aim to expand this literature by examining how these processes unfold after stigmatized individuals have gained employment and are interacting with coworkers. These compensatory strategies can have varying impacts on targets’ workplace relationships, job satisfaction, overall performance, and psychological and physical health outcomes. Leaders and other powerful organizational members can mitigate these negative outcomes and improve employee well being through leader member exchange and perceived supervisor support. With this research, practitioners and organizational leaders can develop a clearer understanding of the experiences of stigmatized individuals and can make more informed decisions, have more intentional policies, and provide better support to make their organizations more inclusive and socially responsible, reduce potential litigation costs and influence legislation. Stigmatized individuals can modify their usage of these strategies to have better outcomes in the workplace and on their psychological and physical health. Allies can be better advocates by understanding the experiences of stigmatized groups. Feedback form