Presentation Type

Poster

Subjects

Memory, Language acquisition -- Psychological aspects, Implicit memory, Explicit memory

Department

Speech and Hearing Sciences

Advisor

Carolyn Quam

Student Level

Post Baccalaureate

Abstract

This study will examine how memory systems are intertwined with language learning by assessing participants’ different memory systems and relating memory skills to the ability to learn and categorize unfamiliar sounds.

Based upon similar work (Maddox, Ing, & Lauritzen, 2006), we hypothesize that the data will show a link between procedural memory and implicit sound categorization, and between declarative memory and explicit sound categorization. Additionally, based on the predictions of the Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (Lum, Conti-Ramsden, Page, & Ullman, 2012), we believe adults with LI will (1) show a weak connection between procedural memory and implicit sound categorization accuracy; (2) demonstrate stronger connections between declarative memory and implicit sound categorization accuracy, suggesting a compensatory strategy; and (3) exhibit weaker performance for learning sounds implicitly when compared to neurotypical adults. Thus far, 46 neurotypical adult participants and 10 LI adult participants have completed assessments of memory and sound-category learning. Preliminary descriptive analyses suggested that LI participants were showing lower performance in procedural-memory and working-memory tasks, and both implicit and explicit sound-category-learning tasks, relative to neurotypical participants. In our presentation, we will extend these analyses to all 56 participants and statistically compare groups to test the predictions of the Procedural Deficit Hypothesis.

Comments/Description

Winner of the 2021 Student Research Symposium Poster Competition

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35413

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Links Between Sound-Category Learning & Memory Skills in Neurotypical & Language-Learning-Disabled Adults

This study will examine how memory systems are intertwined with language learning by assessing participants’ different memory systems and relating memory skills to the ability to learn and categorize unfamiliar sounds.

Based upon similar work (Maddox, Ing, & Lauritzen, 2006), we hypothesize that the data will show a link between procedural memory and implicit sound categorization, and between declarative memory and explicit sound categorization. Additionally, based on the predictions of the Procedural Deficit Hypothesis (Lum, Conti-Ramsden, Page, & Ullman, 2012), we believe adults with LI will (1) show a weak connection between procedural memory and implicit sound categorization accuracy; (2) demonstrate stronger connections between declarative memory and implicit sound categorization accuracy, suggesting a compensatory strategy; and (3) exhibit weaker performance for learning sounds implicitly when compared to neurotypical adults. Thus far, 46 neurotypical adult participants and 10 LI adult participants have completed assessments of memory and sound-category learning. Preliminary descriptive analyses suggested that LI participants were showing lower performance in procedural-memory and working-memory tasks, and both implicit and explicit sound-category-learning tasks, relative to neurotypical participants. In our presentation, we will extend these analyses to all 56 participants and statistically compare groups to test the predictions of the Procedural Deficit Hypothesis.