Presentation Type

Poster

Subjects

Speech disorders -- Social aspects, Stuttering -- Psychological aspects, Stigma (Social psychology), Stutterers -- Attitudes, People with disabilities -- Identity, Intersectionality (Sociology)

Department

Speech and Hearing Sciences

Advisor

Dr. Megann McGill, PhD, CCC-SLP

Student Level

Masters

Other

Speech and Hearing Sciences

Abstract

Stuttering is a fluency disorder that disrupts the forward flow of speech (Guitar, 2014). People who stutter (PWS) have been falsely represented in the media and negatively perceived by the general public (Boyle, 2011; Williams, 2015). This public stigma, including cultural and linguistic differences, contributes to the development of self-stigma (Dean & Medina, 2020; Gerlach et al., 2018; Plexico et al., 2019). Stuttering public stigma also leads to decreased earnings and opportunities in the workplace and higher education discrimination (Gerlach et al., 2018; Klein & Hood, 2014). Consequently, there has yet to exist a research study that considers the intersectionality between multilingualism, multiculturalism, race, gender, and SES background and how these identities and backgrounds influence the type of disability stigma and negative perceptions of PWS. This study will consist of ten PWS who will participate in a 60-minute phenomenological semi-structured interview conducted via Zoom. This phenomenological approach will facilitate an interview space where there’s decreased interviewer bias as the participant can speak from their lived experience and answer in their own words (Roulston, 2010). Results from this study will be analyzed via a thematic analysis utilizing in vivo coding. This data analysis method will allow for the participants’ direct interview responses to be amplified and provide meaning to the study’s data (Manning, 2017). Furthermore, the findings of this research will enable a greater understanding of how these experiences influence PWS's willingness to pursue disability accommodations in professional environments, degree of advocacy skills, accommodation and rights knowledge, and perception of disability status.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35416

Stuttering Accommodations in Professional Environments- The Intersectionality between Multiculturalism, Multilingualism, Stigma, Disability Identity and Rights.pdf (791 kB)
Stuttering Accommodations in Professional Environments: The Intersectionality between Multiculturalism, Multilingualism, Stigma, Disability Identity and Rights

Share

COinS
 

Stuttering Accommodations in Professional Environments: The Intersectionality between Multiculturalism, Multilingualism, Stigma, Disability Identity and Rights

Stuttering is a fluency disorder that disrupts the forward flow of speech (Guitar, 2014). People who stutter (PWS) have been falsely represented in the media and negatively perceived by the general public (Boyle, 2011; Williams, 2015). This public stigma, including cultural and linguistic differences, contributes to the development of self-stigma (Dean & Medina, 2020; Gerlach et al., 2018; Plexico et al., 2019). Stuttering public stigma also leads to decreased earnings and opportunities in the workplace and higher education discrimination (Gerlach et al., 2018; Klein & Hood, 2014). Consequently, there has yet to exist a research study that considers the intersectionality between multilingualism, multiculturalism, race, gender, and SES background and how these identities and backgrounds influence the type of disability stigma and negative perceptions of PWS. This study will consist of ten PWS who will participate in a 60-minute phenomenological semi-structured interview conducted via Zoom. This phenomenological approach will facilitate an interview space where there’s decreased interviewer bias as the participant can speak from their lived experience and answer in their own words (Roulston, 2010). Results from this study will be analyzed via a thematic analysis utilizing in vivo coding. This data analysis method will allow for the participants’ direct interview responses to be amplified and provide meaning to the study’s data (Manning, 2017). Furthermore, the findings of this research will enable a greater understanding of how these experiences influence PWS's willingness to pursue disability accommodations in professional environments, degree of advocacy skills, accommodation and rights knowledge, and perception of disability status.