Presentation Type

Poster

Subjects

Prosodic analysis (Linguistics), Comparative linguistics, Comparative and general grammar --Phonology, Intonation (Phonetics)

Department

Applied Linguistics

Advisor

John Hellermann

Student Level

Undergraduate

Abstract

There has been a growing body research work conducted on L2 prosodic acquisition and cross-linguistic prosodic transfer, with studies more recently turning to the examination of suprasegmental prosodic phenomena like intonation. These studies analyzed data from a variety of L1s and have primarily focused on the impact of age of acquisition and proficiency level on the production of L2 intonation. Further, these studies have almost entirely used elicited data as the basis of their investigation. Several models have been put forth to account for L2 speech production, with the L2 Intonation Learning theory (LILt) (Mennen, 2015) being the most recently advanced model that focuses specifically on L2 intonation. Given that there are still relatively few studies on the nature of L2 intonation acquisition, production, and variation, there remain many gaps in understanding. This study seeks to merge this gap in knowledge by examining the impact and predictability of similarity or dissimilarity of a speaker’s L1 to their L2 on L2 intonation production. Additionally, this study will utilize naturalistic data, an under-used methodological approach to investigate this area, and will determine if the LILt can account for the variations of L2 intonation production found in naturalistic data.

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35426

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L2 prosodic variation: The effect of L1 typology on L2 question intonation

There has been a growing body research work conducted on L2 prosodic acquisition and cross-linguistic prosodic transfer, with studies more recently turning to the examination of suprasegmental prosodic phenomena like intonation. These studies analyzed data from a variety of L1s and have primarily focused on the impact of age of acquisition and proficiency level on the production of L2 intonation. Further, these studies have almost entirely used elicited data as the basis of their investigation. Several models have been put forth to account for L2 speech production, with the L2 Intonation Learning theory (LILt) (Mennen, 2015) being the most recently advanced model that focuses specifically on L2 intonation. Given that there are still relatively few studies on the nature of L2 intonation acquisition, production, and variation, there remain many gaps in understanding. This study seeks to merge this gap in knowledge by examining the impact and predictability of similarity or dissimilarity of a speaker’s L1 to their L2 on L2 intonation production. Additionally, this study will utilize naturalistic data, an under-used methodological approach to investigate this area, and will determine if the LILt can account for the variations of L2 intonation production found in naturalistic data.

Please provide feedback:

https://forms.gle/daTaJ6aBG5yAeGzBA