Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-5-2022 11:00 AM

End Date

4-5-2022 1:00 PM

Subjects

Annual Killifish, Diapause, Anoxia, Age-related Macular Degeneration, Immunohistochemistry

Advisor

Jason Podrabsky

Student Level

Doctoral

Abstract

Vertebrate eye development is highly conserved. Current models have identified the gene networks involved in eye development, but lack the context of extreme environmental conditions that challenge these fundamental programs. Typical vertebrates live for many years while annual killifishes can complete their entire adult lifespan in a matter of weeks. Thus, annual killifishes are a strong model for age-related diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD); an irreversible loss of central vision. Annual killifishes enter embryonic diapause; a period of developmental and metabolic dormancy. These embryos are extremely resistant to environmental stresses such as hypoxia/anoxia that would cause irreparable damage to vital organs, such as the eyes, in other species and even in adult killifishes. I hypothesize annual killifish embryos possess molecular and physiological mechanisms that bolster survival and prevent loss of eye cells when faced with oxygen stress, and that their regenerative abilities can be harnessed to treat or prevent AMD. The first step in evaluating this hypothesis is to characterize normal eye development and establish annual killifish as a model for eye development and disease. Whole-mount immunohistochemistry will be used to explore the expression and localization of proteins critical for eye development and cellular regeneration.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37495

Included in

Biology Commons

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May 4th, 11:00 AM May 4th, 1:00 PM

Visualization of Eye Development in Annual Killifish Using Whole-mount Immunohistochemistry

Vertebrate eye development is highly conserved. Current models have identified the gene networks involved in eye development, but lack the context of extreme environmental conditions that challenge these fundamental programs. Typical vertebrates live for many years while annual killifishes can complete their entire adult lifespan in a matter of weeks. Thus, annual killifishes are a strong model for age-related diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD); an irreversible loss of central vision. Annual killifishes enter embryonic diapause; a period of developmental and metabolic dormancy. These embryos are extremely resistant to environmental stresses such as hypoxia/anoxia that would cause irreparable damage to vital organs, such as the eyes, in other species and even in adult killifishes. I hypothesize annual killifish embryos possess molecular and physiological mechanisms that bolster survival and prevent loss of eye cells when faced with oxygen stress, and that their regenerative abilities can be harnessed to treat or prevent AMD. The first step in evaluating this hypothesis is to characterize normal eye development and establish annual killifish as a model for eye development and disease. Whole-mount immunohistochemistry will be used to explore the expression and localization of proteins critical for eye development and cellular regeneration.