Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

5-8-2024 11:00 AM

End Date

5-8-2024 1:00 PM

Subjects

Biomimetics--Biotechnology, Actuators

Advisor

Alex Hunt

Student Level

Doctoral

Abstract

Research in the Agile and Adaptive Robotics Lab involves the creation of biomimetic robots. To this end, we developed a self-balancing robot leg actuated with braided pneumatic actuators (BPAs)—a type of pneumatic artificial muscle. These BPAs, akin to human muscles, exhibit properties such as high strength-to-weight ratio and tunable passive stiffness. An Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) was placed on top of the tibia for feedback and the tibia and foot were connected with a hinge joint. The orientation of the ankle joint was controlled with an Arduino microcontroller sending commands to the proportional pressure valves supplying the BPAs. Leg balance was achieved on flat land and also when it was placed on an independent oscillating balance platform. The leg was enhanced to be more biomimetic, featuring a ball-and-socket joint and dorsiflexor and plantar flexor BPAs controlled by on/off commands to the valve manifold. This new leg was able to maintain balance on flat terrain.

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May 8th, 11:00 AM May 8th, 1:00 PM

Self-Balancing Robot Leg

Research in the Agile and Adaptive Robotics Lab involves the creation of biomimetic robots. To this end, we developed a self-balancing robot leg actuated with braided pneumatic actuators (BPAs)—a type of pneumatic artificial muscle. These BPAs, akin to human muscles, exhibit properties such as high strength-to-weight ratio and tunable passive stiffness. An Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) was placed on top of the tibia for feedback and the tibia and foot were connected with a hinge joint. The orientation of the ankle joint was controlled with an Arduino microcontroller sending commands to the proportional pressure valves supplying the BPAs. Leg balance was achieved on flat land and also when it was placed on an independent oscillating balance platform. The leg was enhanced to be more biomimetic, featuring a ball-and-socket joint and dorsiflexor and plantar flexor BPAs controlled by on/off commands to the valve manifold. This new leg was able to maintain balance on flat terrain.