Presentation Type

Poster

Subjects

Brain -- Wounds and injuries -- Complications, Brain-damaged children -- Education, Speech therapists -- Practice, Minority students -- United States -- Discipline, Executive functioning, Discrimination in education

Department

Speech and Hearing Sciences

Advisor

Sarah Key-DeLyria

Student Level

Masters

Abstract

Historically, BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) students are disciplined more frequently, and more severely than their white counterparts in educational settings. This often includes suspension, expulsion, arrest, entry into the juvenile justice system, and incarceration. Within this group of students, there is a disproportionately large number of students experiencing executive functioning and communication deficits as a result of TBI. Research tells us that these impairments often present as a wide variety of behaviors which in BIPOC students are often misdiagnosed by school administration as defiant or disruptive and are disciplined more heavily than their white peers. Speech language pathologists (SLP) have specialized training to support individuals experiencing these symptoms, but historically have not provided these services in schools.

We created a needs assessment survey examining resources available to school-based SLPs for the evaluation and treatment of executive functioning and communication deficits related to traumatic brain injury (TBI) in order to determine what resources are necessary for SLPs to use their skills to advocate for BIPOC students and disrupt the school-to-confinement pipeline. Participants were 28 members of Oregon Speech-Language Hearing Association.

Please provide feedback:

https://forms.gle/h6B87k5ut3WbgCWE6

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The Role of the School SLP in Treatment of TBI: Implications for BIPOC Students

Historically, BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) students are disciplined more frequently, and more severely than their white counterparts in educational settings. This often includes suspension, expulsion, arrest, entry into the juvenile justice system, and incarceration. Within this group of students, there is a disproportionately large number of students experiencing executive functioning and communication deficits as a result of TBI. Research tells us that these impairments often present as a wide variety of behaviors which in BIPOC students are often misdiagnosed by school administration as defiant or disruptive and are disciplined more heavily than their white peers. Speech language pathologists (SLP) have specialized training to support individuals experiencing these symptoms, but historically have not provided these services in schools.

We created a needs assessment survey examining resources available to school-based SLPs for the evaluation and treatment of executive functioning and communication deficits related to traumatic brain injury (TBI) in order to determine what resources are necessary for SLPs to use their skills to advocate for BIPOC students and disrupt the school-to-confinement pipeline. Participants were 28 members of Oregon Speech-Language Hearing Association.

Please provide feedback:

https://forms.gle/h6B87k5ut3WbgCWE6